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Friday, April 3, 2015

It's clobberin' time! (3)

 [7: 53]

(MS.) Knight Ives falls: too hard proves the blow,
So that it succeeds in unhorsing him;
While the Pagan, stronger and more muscular,
Does not fall, though swinging on the saddle.
Then, in a proud and despising attitude
He speaks to the fallen warrior, and says,
"Surrender! It will suffice to your glory
To be able to tell with whom you fought."

(Printed text) Knight Ives falls, and with bitter pain
That strong blow seems to unsaddle him.
And the Pagan said, "I will save you for Death
If you ask for more, or remount the horse."
Then, in a proud and despising attitude
He again speaks to the fallen warrior:
"Surrender! It will suffice to your glory
To be able to tell with whom you fought."


Notes
The definitive text further stresses Argantes' superiority. The shift from present tense to past tense, and vice versa, is a characteristic of Tasso's poetry; in our translations, however, verb tenses are often levelled out for fluency.