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Tuesday, December 15, 2015

The counsel of Nicaea (2)

Nicaea's sorrows begin again as soon as she wakes up the next morning.

[8: 6]

Piange e sospira, e quando i caldi raggi
Fuggon le gregge a la dolce ombra assise,
Ne la scorza de' pini o pur de' faggi
Segnò l'amato nome in mille guise;
E de la sua fortuna i gravi oltraggi
E i vari casi in dura scorza incise,
E 'n rileggendo poi le propie note
Spargea di pianto le vermiglie gote.

She weeps and sighs, and when the flocks
Shun the sun's rays in the sweet shades,
On the bark of pines and beech trees
She keeps writing her beloved's name. (*)
The deep inner scars of her fortune,
The many accidents she also carved,
And then rereading her own sentences,
She sprinkled her red cheeks with tears.

(*) This scene overturns the parallel episode in Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, when Angelica -- with her new love Medoro -- joyfully writes messages on the trees; so that [SPOILER] when Paladin Roland happens to find their love messages, he will suffer so much as to go insane (the furioso in the title).